The war against Iraq is also the war against global terroris

The issue of this article is that if Iraq and Saddam’s regime is not disarmed of their weapons of mass destruction, Saddam will use his cover of his nuclear weapons to try to forcibly unite the Middle East to confront the Western alliance.

I chose article number three, which is “The war against Iraq is also the war against global terrorism- and the writer of this article is Dr. Colin Rubenstein who is the executive director of Australia/Jewish and Australia/Israel affairs.

The writer’s contention in this issue is that Saddam Hussein’s regime is a breeding ground for international terrorism and is a major threat to Australia security. Which is shown by such evidence as “The greatest single security threat faced by Australia is not a conventional invasion or attack, but a mega- terrorism of the sort the world witnessed on September 11,2001- and “More recently, the murderous suicide attack that killed 88 Australians in Bali sent a message that Australians are very much in the line of fire-.

The tone provided in this issue endorses his position towards the War on Iraq, which is a positive one. His approach to writing this article was aggressive and forceful but also very informative and factual. The tone of the language presented throughout the issue is put in a way to make the reader sway more to the writer’s opinion The tone the writer’s uses is very supportive of the war on Iraq and very disappointed in the way some of Australia’s society is patronizing what must be done to save them in the long run.

The writer refers to the following types of appeals:

Appeal to Fear:

“the murderous suicide attack that killed 88 killed 88 Australians in Bali sent a message that Australians are very much in the firing line-.

“If not disarmed, Saddam will use the cover of his nuclear weapons to try forcibly unite the Middle East to confront the West-.

“It is true Saddam is not the only homicidal dictator in the world, though he is unequivocally one of the worst. But he is uniquely dangerous in a number of ways: he is an active sponsor of terrorist groups; has relentlessly pursued weapons of mass destruction in defiance of UN resolutions and international treaties: he has a unique record of military aggression against his neighbour, and finally, uniquely in the world, he has used chemical weapons both against enemy soldiers and his own civilians-.

“His rogue regime threatens Australia as well-.

“Efforts to contain weapons of mass destruction proliferation before there is a catastrophic nuclear repeat-.

Saddam is also overwhelmingly likely to be frantically trying to make a nuclear bomb, something Iraqi scientists were only a few months away from in 1991-.

These groups largely view Australia as an important local enemy, both because of it’s Western culture and because we have supported regional stability and independence for East Timor-.

The writer’s main tool in this issue is to bring fear within the reader giving credible reasons to the reader to be persuaded and Converted to the writers very dominate opinion. Although the writer uses a lot of Appeals to the writer’s sense of secureness and attacks the readers fear there is no evidence of other appeals such as Tradition, Family values, Patriotism, Security, Justice and Emotional appeal.

The writer uses a few different strategies and a diversity of literary terms to get their point of view across more pungently. The writer uses the following persuasive strategies to give the reader a better view of his opinion. Such as: Metaphors eg: “Saddam Hussein’s regime is a breeding ground for international terrorists-. The writer also uses symbolism “Saddam can be seen as a symbol of fear-. The writer uses a rare persuasive strategy, which is Oxymoron -Once he does, he will be almost invulnerable-. Also alliterations are used including this example “rouge regime-. Tautologies are also used throughout the issue cunningly.

The writer uses many persuasive techniques to make his stance or point of view on the issue stronger and more convincing. A rhetorical question is used “Many opponents of the military build-up in the gulf are also asking why now?, noting that the Iraqi threat has existed for more than a decade!-. Scare Tactics are used right through the issue appealing to the reader’s emotions “If not disarmed, Saddam will use the cover of his nuclear weapons to try to forcibly unite the Middle East, against the West-. The writer uses Irony and Scapegoating to say how unbelievable something is “Everything known about the history of man and the goals of the regime makes the claim by Iraq that it unilaterally destroyed all its remaining weapons, without telling anyone or documenting the destruction, insanely implausible-.

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